cutereptiles:

eteo:

awez-im-gohst:

smallstrawhat:

trillgamesh:

this is one of the sweetest videos ive ever seen

this lizard’s name is peperonie this is the most amazing video on the internet

WHY IS THIS THE CUTEST THING FOR WHY

he really fuckign likes those yams omg

Happy birthday noms!

This is adorable and made me smile.

comraderogers:

there were over 3,000 lightening strikes in 2 hours last night in the UK

this is a direct result of people complaining about Thor being female. You’ve angered her

pbsnature:

"Geoffrey" a baby scarlet macaw hatches in an incubator. "Parrot Confidential" airs on Nature on PBS Wednesday, Nov. 13 at 8/7c: http://youtu.be/VQE1b_QwJBU Geoffrey was born at the ARA Project, a macaw conservation group in Central Costa Rica. His mother was an ex-pet and his father was poached from the wild. When his mother abandoned her eggs, Geoffrey had to be raised in an incubator. 

becausebirds:

whatthefauna:

Amazonian royal flycatchers are typically drab-looking brown birds. During courtship, however, both sexes display a brightly colored crest that is normally hidden from view. It is rare among birds for both males (red) and females (yellow) to have such colorful markings.

Image credit: Andrew Snyder

Hey baby, wanna see my crest?

keeperchat:

HAPPY NATIONAL ZOO KEEPER WEEK!!!From the AAZK website:”National Zoo Keeper Week Proclamation
WHEREAS, worldwide animal populations are declining at an alarming rate with many facing extinction; and
WHEREAS, zoological institutions have become the final hope for many endangered species recovery programs through conservation research, release programs, and by being a portal through which the general public can view and appreciate disappearing wildlife; and
WHEREAS, zoological institutions are also population managers of keystone and cornerstone species, emphasizing the restoration of not just the endangered species, but a restoration of the delicate balance of nature; and
WHEREAS, zoo keepers are the frontline soldiers for conservation, participating in the battle for species survival and preservation of the natural homelands of the animals they care for through public awareness, education, and exhibition; and
WHEREAS, zoo keepers have become animal caretakers devoting their lives to caring for these animals; and
WHEREAS, zoo keepers have become the spokespersons for vanishing wildlife, carrying the conservation message of habitat loss, endangered species, and preservation of nature’s threatened wildlands to the public; and
WHEREAS, zoo keepers have become animal specialists, as educators, choreographers of animal behaviors through enrichment, behavior managers through operant conditioning, and reproductive specialists through improved observations and husbandry; and
WHEREAS, to help increase public awareness about the need to preserve our precious habitats and the animals which inhabit them and to recognize the roles that zookeepers play in animal conservation and education, The American Association of Zoo Keepers invites all AAZK chapters to participate in National Zoo Keeper Week.”

keeperchat:

HAPPY NATIONAL ZOO KEEPER WEEK!!!

From the AAZK website:

National Zoo Keeper Week Proclamation

WHEREAS, worldwide animal populations are declining at an alarming rate with many facing extinction; and

WHEREAS, zoological institutions have become the final hope for many endangered species recovery programs through conservation research, release programs, and by being a portal through which the general public can view and appreciate disappearing wildlife; and

WHEREAS, zoological institutions are also population managers of keystone and cornerstone species, emphasizing the restoration of not just the endangered species, but a restoration of the delicate balance of nature; and

WHEREAS, zoo keepers are the frontline soldiers for conservation, participating in the battle for species survival and preservation of the natural homelands of the animals they care for through public awareness, education, and exhibition; and

WHEREAS, zoo keepers have become animal caretakers devoting their lives to caring for these animals; and

WHEREAS, zoo keepers have become the spokespersons for vanishing wildlife, carrying the conservation message of habitat loss, endangered species, and preservation of nature’s threatened wildlands to the public; and

WHEREAS, zoo keepers have become animal specialists, as educators, choreographers of animal behaviors through enrichment, behavior managers through operant conditioning, and reproductive specialists through improved observations and husbandry; and

WHEREAS, to help increase public awareness about the need to preserve our precious habitats and the animals which inhabit them and to recognize the roles that zookeepers play in animal conservation and education, The American Association of Zoo Keepers invites all AAZK chapters to participate in National Zoo Keeper Week.”

operafantomet:

In sleep he sang to me… In dreams he came… 

adsertoris:

Sigourney Weaver and the Alien Queen on the set of Aliens (1986)

adsertoris:

Sigourney Weaver and the Alien Queen on the set of Aliens (1986)

ravendroppings:

parliamentrook:

ossuariajewelry:

New piece posted today, and it’s quite the show stopper! It’s made entirely of buzzard bones and utilizes about 50% of the skeleton. Check it out over at www.ossuaria.com!

tumblr actually threw a recommended post onto my dash that I was happy to see! lovely work

Erm…if by “buzzard” (“Texas carrion bird”) she means turkey vulture (or black vulture) then this is highly illegal.  I think I may send her a note.
Edit: Note sent.  I think she probably doesn’t realize that these birds are protected by the MBTA.  Here’s to hoping she listens.  I don’t like to see people get in trouble because of ignorance of relevant laws.

The other bird pieces (grackle feet, possible the duck mandibles) are also protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and depending on what state you live in, some of the mammal and reptile skeletons may also be illegal to purchase.  For example, it is illegal to possess parts of an Alligator Snapping Turtle in Arkansas, and California has a particularly extensive list of animals whose parts you are prohibited from owning, buying, or selling—including the python necklace, depending on what species of ‘python’ is comes from.  You should always check your local Fish & Wildlife website or call regarding laws before picking up or purchasing any wild animal parts—in many states, you even need a salvage permit to collect roadkill or other dead animal parts you may find.  Some of these laws may seem extremely restrictive, but they exist to protect the animals in question, since it is difficult to prove you did not harm the original owner of that eagle feather or wolf skull, or turtle shell, etc that you found.  Two website resources you can use to learn about the legality of animal parts in your area in addition to your state Fish & Wildlife department are http://www.thegreenwolf.com/animal-parts-laws/ and http://www.animallaw.info/

ravendroppings:

parliamentrook:

ossuariajewelry:

New piece posted today, and it’s quite the show stopper! It’s made entirely of buzzard bones and utilizes about 50% of the skeleton. Check it out over at www.ossuaria.com!

tumblr actually threw a recommended post onto my dash that I was happy to see! lovely work

Erm…if by “buzzard” (“Texas carrion bird”) she means turkey vulture (or black vulture) then this is highly illegal.  I think I may send her a note.

Edit: Note sent.  I think she probably doesn’t realize that these birds are protected by the MBTA.  Here’s to hoping she listens.  I don’t like to see people get in trouble because of ignorance of relevant laws.

The other bird pieces (grackle feet, possible the duck mandibles) are also protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and depending on what state you live in, some of the mammal and reptile skeletons may also be illegal to purchase.  For example, it is illegal to possess parts of an Alligator Snapping Turtle in Arkansas, and California has a particularly extensive list of animals whose parts you are prohibited from owning, buying, or selling—including the python necklace, depending on what species of ‘python’ is comes from.  You should always check your local Fish & Wildlife website or call regarding laws before picking up or purchasing any wild animal parts—in many states, you even need a salvage permit to collect roadkill or other dead animal parts you may find.  Some of these laws may seem extremely restrictive, but they exist to protect the animals in question, since it is difficult to prove you did not harm the original owner of that eagle feather or wolf skull, or turtle shell, etc that you found.  Two website resources you can use to learn about the legality of animal parts in your area in addition to your state Fish & Wildlife department are http://www.thegreenwolf.com/animal-parts-laws/ and http://www.animallaw.info/

leinton:

Guys I feel really pretty today this is exactly how I want to present except maybe longer hair.

Why can’t I see you in person now that you’re more gorgeous than ever? 

leinton:

Guys I feel really pretty today this is exactly how I want to present except maybe longer hair.

Why can’t I see you in person now that you’re more gorgeous than ever? 

becausebirds:

avianawareness:

Door no stop us from loves and scritches

Doors can’t stop our love.

Homewreckers.

becausebirds:

avianawareness:

Door no stop us from loves and scritches

Doors can’t stop our love.

Homewreckers.

stuffman:

image

People have written a lot of touchy-feely pieces on this subject but I thought I’d get right to the heart of the matter

ravendroppings:

retrogradeworks:

folkthesystem:

 

And even if that mouth doesn’t have teeth, it can still hurt.

Every time I do an education event with a snake and people ask me “can it bite”…this is pretty much my response.

I get asked “Will it bite me?” about a billion times a day (only a slight exaggeration).  This is becoming my go-to answer, with “But they’ll only bite if you pet or grab them or make them feel threatened—remember, you are so much bigger than they are—and they’ll usually give you a warning nip to tell you they don’t like what you are doing first.  Please don’t try to touch them.”  The animals in question are a variety of birds.  Unfortunately, the standard response on the part of the public is to try to pet the animal anyways, and then I have to jump in and explain in the politest way possible how disrespectful it is to the animal to insist on touching it when the animal is communicating through lunges and bites that it does NOT want to be pet, and how they are making the animals less likely to want to be near people, which ruins the interactive aviary experience for future visitors.  Of course, then I get visitors who wait till they think my back is turned to continue poking at the animal.  That’s when I stop being polite.  I don’t get it.  Why are people so rude to the animals in zoos?  They are not performers.  You paid to visit their HOME.  Be a good guest.

ravendroppings:

retrogradeworks:

folkthesystem:

 

And even if that mouth doesn’t have teeth, it can still hurt.

Every time I do an education event with a snake and people ask me “can it bite”…this is pretty much my response.

I get asked “Will it bite me?” about a billion times a day (only a slight exaggeration).  This is becoming my go-to answer, with “But they’ll only bite if you pet or grab them or make them feel threatened—remember, you are so much bigger than they are—and they’ll usually give you a warning nip to tell you they don’t like what you are doing first.  Please don’t try to touch them.”  The animals in question are a variety of birds.  Unfortunately, the standard response on the part of the public is to try to pet the animal anyways, and then I have to jump in and explain in the politest way possible how disrespectful it is to the animal to insist on touching it when the animal is communicating through lunges and bites that it does NOT want to be pet, and how they are making the animals less likely to want to be near people, which ruins the interactive aviary experience for future visitors.  Of course, then I get visitors who wait till they think my back is turned to continue poking at the animal.  That’s when I stop being polite.  I don’t get it.  Why are people so rude to the animals in zoos?  They are not performers.  You paid to visit their HOME.  Be a good guest.

coolator:

jurassic park from the raptors’ perspective 

becausebirds:

One penguin falls down, watch how the rest react.